Lilies are Toxic to Cats

nolilliesforkitties

No Lilies for Kitties!

Why are the Easter holiday and Mother’s Day two of the most dangerous holidays for cats? The answer is simple—lily poisoning. Exposure to common lilies such as Easter lilies, tiger lilies and stargazer lilies sicken and kill thousands of cats annually. What’s even more dangerous is that less than 30% of cat owners realize these common and seemingly “benign” lilies are fatal to our feline friends. That’s about to change. We want to introduce you to a new educational campaign—‘No Lilies for Kitties!’

Pet Poison Helpline, in partnership with the Small Animal Welfare Committee of the Minnesota Veterinary Medical Association,  have teamed up to increase awareness of lily poisoning to cat owners and remind veterinarians that we are heading into lily season. Please help us spread the word and learn why you need to “leave out the lilies”.

Lilies 101

Many different kinds of plants are found or sold with “lily” as part of their name. A few grow wild in ditches and wooded areas, some are sold as bulbs in garden shops, and many are used in floral arrangements. If you live with cats, it’s critical to know which lilies are toxic to your feline friend.

The Most Dangerous Lilies for Cats

The most dangerous and potentially fatal lilies for cats are those found in the genus Lilium and Hemerocallis. These beautiful and affordable flowers are often found in cut-flower bouquets or potted for the Easter holiday. If you have cats at home, it’s critical that you do not bring these flowers inside.

asiaticlily

 

  • Asiatic Lily – including hybrids (Lilium asiatica)
  • Daylily (Hemerocallis species)
  • Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum)
  • Japanese Show lily (Lilium speciosum)
  • Rubrum lily (Lilium speciosum var. rubrum)
  • Stargazer lily (Lilium “Stargazer” – a hybrid)
  • Tiger lily (Lilium tigrinum or lancifolium)
  • Wood lily (Lilium philadelphicum or umbellatum)

These beautiful and affordable flowers are often found in cut-flower bouquets or potted for the Easter holiday. If you have cats at home, it’s critical that you do not bring these flowers inside. The toxin has not been identified, but exposure to any part of the plant, including leaves, flowers, pollen, or even the water from the vase may result in acute kidney failure in cats. These ingestions are medical emergencies requiring immediate veterinary care. Early decontamination, aggressive intravenous fluid therapy, renal function tests, and supportive care greatly improve a cat’s prognosis. A delay of treatment of more than 18 hours after ingestion generally results in irreversible renal failure. Dogs may experience minor gastrointestinal upset after ingestion of these lilies but do not appear to develop kidney damage.

Safer Cut-Flower Alternatives

When buying flowers or ordering them for delivery, remember to “leave out the lilies”! It’s advisable to specifically instruct florists to not include and liliwes in the Lilium species such as stargazer, Asiatic, Oriental or tiger lilies. Giving florists the specific name of the flower species can help avoid confusion.

tulips

Instead, consider these safer alternatives for cut flower arrangements and bouquets:

  • Carnation*
  • Daisy (Gerbera and others)
  • Hyancith*
  • Iris*
  • Chrysanthemum a.k.a. Mums*
  • Orchid
  • Peruvian Lily (Alstroemeria species)*
  • Rose
  • Spring crocus
  • Snapdragon
  • Sunflower
  • Tulips*
  • Zinnia

*These plants may cause more gastrointestinal irritation or upset (drooling, vomiting, and/or diarrhea) than others on the list but are not expected to cause severe poisoning (i.e. kidney, liver or nervous system effects).

 

Other Highly Toxic Lilies (risk to dogs, cats, and people)

Other types of dangerous “lily” plants include the lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis) and gloriosa or flame lily (Gloriosa superba).   Lily of the valley contains cardenolides or digitalis like toxins which do not cause kidney failure, but may cause life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and death when ingested by dogs, cats, or people.  Equally toxic to all animals is the gloriosa lily. The toxic agent is colchicine (toxic to rapidly dividing cells); the roots or tubers may contain enough toxins to cause serious multi-system organ failure in cats and dogs that chew on them. Early and aggressive therapy is generally needed when these plants are ingested.

Less Harmful Lilies (risk to dog and cats)

Less serious consequences occur when pets chew or swallow plant pieces from “lilies” such as the calla lily (Zantedeschia spp.) and peace lily (Spathiphyllum spp.) which contain insoluble oxalate crystals that are direct irritants to the mouth, tongue, throat, and esophagus. Drooling, foaming, or pawing at the mouth, vocalization, and vomiting are commonly reported when pets chew on these plants; respiratory distress due to swelling of the airway can occur but is more rare. The Peruvian lily (Alstromeria aurea) contains tulipin A, a toxin that may cause gastrointestinal problems such as vomiting or diarrhea if ingested in large amounts. None of these lilies cause acute kidney failure in cats like the Lilium or Hemerocallis (daylily) species.

What to do if your pet eats a lily?

Cats and other pets consuming any part of a “lily” plant may need immediate veterinary medical care. In order to quickly assess the severity of the situation, pet owners should call Pet Poison Helpline (800-213-6680) or bring the animal and plant to their veterinarian as soon as possible.  Early identification of the specific lily and appropriate treatment will usually prevent most undesirable outcome

 

source: petpoisonhelpline.com

Calming Your Dog During a Thunderstorm

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Tips for Keeping Your Dog Calm During Thunderstorms

It is very common for dogs to feel upset by the booming thunder and flashing lightening of a thunderstorm.  In fact, because dogs are especially sensitive to barometric pressure, they can sense an oncoming storm before you can.  They may start to act anxious, chew on things or even run away in a panic.  While it may seem natural to sit down on the floor and coddle your dog in soothing tones during a thunderstorm, this will only reinforce his or her anxious behavior in the long run.  These tips can help you learn how to calm your dog during a storm by teaching him that it’s only noise and nothing to get upset about.

Calm Your Dog’s Thunderstorm Anxiety: Calmness Begins with You

First:   Dogs can pick up on their humans’ feeling, so it is important for you to stay calm if you are to be able to calm your dog.  If they sense your anxiety, that will only make them feel and act worse.

Second:  Provide a safe, enclosed, den-like area where your dog can securely sit out the storm.  A crate inside the house is the perfect place because they feel safer there with a blanket and chew toy to gnaw on.  If your dog is an outside dog, cover his kennel with a blanket and make sure he is secured inside.

Third:  If you do not use a crate to calm your dog, make sure the room where you keep him is safe and devoid of small or sharp objects that he could swallow or chew on, as they may do when they are stressed out.  Crating is recommended, but if this is not possible for you, make sure he has a soft, secure place where he feels safe.  Keep the doors and windows closed and curtained to dull outside noises and lights of the storm.  Sometimes turning on a TV or some music that the dog is used to hearing can dull sounds and help calm your dog.

Fourth:  Keep your dog away from exits and entrances into your home.  Some dogs become so stressed out that they may attack people coming in or out.  He may also make a run for it if the door is opened.

Fifth:  One great way to calm your dog’s thunderstorm fear is to condition him to accept that storms are nothing to worry about.  Using environmental recordings of storms, starting out softly and then making them gradually louder while having everyone else in the house go calmly about their business has reprogrammed many dogs to stay calm during a storm.  This may take some time, but many owners have had success with this method.

Note:  If your dog has an accident during a storm, be patient and understanding.  Don’t make a big deal about it and be prepared to clean up without a lot of fanfare.

***We urge you to have identification on your dog.  Both tags on the collar AND a microchip will help ensure the safe return of your dog in the event that he does escape***

 

Source: woodbridgeanimalhospital.com

Pet Insurance

what_is_pet_insurancePet Insurance is a frequent topic at the veterinarian’s office.  We are frequently asked by our clients if coverage for their pet is a good idea. They wonder, is it worth the cost?  How does it work? What does it cover?

If you have pet insurance, it is very comforting knowing that you are prepared to make decisions on your pet’s care that are not based on finances.  We have had many instances of clients being able to choose more costly diagnostics and treatments knowing they had insurance to help cover the costs.

Pet insurance is far less complicated than human health insurance.  While full payment to your veterinarian is due at the time of services, a simple claim form submitted to your insurance company will start your claim and reimbursement process (based on your policy coverage). Some companies even have smart phone apps to make it even easier! Most companies do very well in keeping you up to date as your claim moves forward.

There are many different pet insurance companies and each company offers policies in a range of cost and coverage. Our doctors encourage you to take some time and research the different companies and their policies to determine which is best for your budget and desired coverage.

Halloween Safety

halloween-pet-safety

Attention, animal lovers, it’s almost the spookiest night of the year! The ASPCA recommends taking some common sense precautions this Halloween to keep you and your pet saying “trick or treat!”

1. No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters, not for Scruffy and Fluffy. Chocolate in all forms—especially dark or baking chocolate—can be very dangerous for dogs and cats. Candies containing the artificial sweetener xylitol can also cause problems. If you do suspect your pet has ingested something toxic, please call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435.

2. Popular Halloween plants such as pumpkins and decorative corn are considered to be relatively nontoxic, but they can produce stomach upset in pets who nibble on them.

3. Wires and cords from electric lights and other decorations should be kept out of reach of your pets. If chewed, your pet might suffer cuts or burns, or receive a possibly life-threatening electrical shock.

4. A carved pumpkin certainly is festive, but do exercise caution if you choose to add a candle. Pets can easily knock a lit pumpkin over and cause a fire. Curious kittens especially run the risk of getting burned or singed by candle flames.

5. Dress-up can be a big mess-up for some pets. Please don’t put your dog or cat in a costume UNLESS you know he or she loves it (yup, a few pets are real hams!). For pets who prefer their “birthday suits,” however, wearing a costume may cause undue stress.

6. If you do dress up your pet, make sure the costume isn’t annoying or unsafe. It should not constrict the animal’s movement or hearing, or impede his ability to breathe, bark or meow. Also, be sure to try on costumes before the big night. If your pet seems distressed, allergic or shows abnormal behavior, consider letting him go au naturale or donning a festive bandana.

7. Take a closer look at your pet’s costume and make sure it does not have small, dangling or easily chewed-off pieces that he could choke on. Also, ill-fitting outfits can get twisted on external objects or your pet, leading to injury.

8. All but the most social dogs and cats should be kept in a separate room away from the front door during peak trick-or-treating hours. Too many strangers can be scary and stressful for pets.

9. When opening the door for trick-or-treaters, take care that your cat or dog doesn’t dart outside.

10. IDs, please! Always make sure your dog or cat has proper identification. If for any reason your pet escapes and becomes lost, a collar and tags and/or a microchip can be a lifesaver, increaing the chances that he or she will be returned to you

 

source: aspca.org

Pain Awareness Month

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September is Pain Awareness Month and here are several things you should know about your pet’s pain.

Pets are often stoic about pain.  As predators, cats are especially adept at masking their pain.  So as a pet owner, you need to keep a keen eye on your furry friends to uncover aches and pains early.

  1. Behavior changes may signal pain. This includes cats who don’t enjoy being petted anymore, dogs who become aggressive, or pets who stop jumping on the bed or climbing stairs.
  2. The medication your veterinarian prescribes is central to your pet’s health and comfort. It’s important to avoid missing doses or dosing improperly.
  3. There are various formulations and ways to administer your pet’s pain medication. Your veterinarian will help to find the right dosage and delivery method which increases the chance that your pet gets the medication it needs to be comfortable.
  4. Human medications are often dangerous for pets. Always ask your veterinarian before you give your pet any medication that isn’t prescribed.
  5. There are several ways to make your pet feel more comfortable. If you’re good with tools, you can build a ramp for better accessibility.  There are also all types of products available that make things easier for your pet, such as raised food and water dishes or a litter box with lowered sides.  Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation.
  6. Diet – especially to maintain an ideal weight – is key. For older pets with painful conditions such as osteoarthritis, helping them reach a healthy weight can help them manage pain and maintain mobility.

 

Source: dvm360.com