Hot Weather Safety Tips

We all love spending the long, sunny days of summer outdoors with our furry companions, but being overeager in hot weather can spell danger. To prevent your pet from overheating, take these simple precautions provided by ASPCA experts:

  • Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot or humid outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful not to over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.
  • Know the symptoms of overheating in pets, which include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.
  • Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.
  • Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle.Not only can it lead to fatal heat stroke, it is illegal in several states!
  • Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool—not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals.
  • Open unscreened windows pose a real danger to pets, who often fall out of them.Keep all unscreened windows or doors in your home closed, and make sure adjustable screens are tightly secured.
  • Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.
  • When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close to the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn. Keep walks during these times to a minimum.
  • Commonly used rodenticides and lawn and garden insecticides can be harmful to cats and dogs if ingested, so keep them out of reach. Keep citronella candles, tiki torch products and insect coils of out pets’ reach as well. Call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 if you suspect your animal has ingested a poisonous substance.
  • Remember that food and drink commonly found at barbeques can be poisonous to pets. Keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression and comas. Similarly, remember that the snacks enjoyed by your human friends should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments. Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol.
  • Please leave pets at home when you head out to Fourth of July celebrations, and never use fireworks around pets. Exposure to lit fireworks can potentially result in severe burns or trauma, and even unused fireworks can contain hazardous materials. Many pets are also fearful of loud noises and can become lost, scared or disoriented, so it’s best to keep your little guys safe from the noise in a quiet, sheltered and escape-proof area of your home.

Source: aspca.org

 

 

Crate Training – Puppy or Older Dog

 

cratetraining2“Private room with a view. Ideal for traveling dogs or for those who just want a secure, quiet place to hang out at home.”

That’s how your dog might describe his crate. It’s his own personal den where he can find comfort and solitude while you know he’s safe and secure—and not shredding your house while you’re out running errands.

Crating Philosophy

Crate training uses a dog’s natural instincts as a den animal. A wild dog’s den is his home, a place to sleep, hide from danger, and raise a family. The crate becomes your dog’s den, an ideal spot to snooze or take refuge during a thunderstorm.

  • The primary use for a crate is housetraining. Dogs don’t like to soil their dens.
  • The crate can limit access to the rest of the house while he learns other rules, like not to chew on furniture.
  • Crates are a safe way to transport your dog in the car.

Crating Caution

A crate isn’t a magical solution. If not used correctly, a dog can feel trapped and frustrated.

  • Never use the crate as a punishment. Your dog will come to fear it and refuse to enter it.
  • Don’t leave your dog in the crate too long.  A dog that’s crated day and night doesn’t get enough exercise or human interaction and can become depressed or anxious. You may have to change your schedule, hire a pet sitter, or take your dog to a doggie daycare facility to reduce the amount of time he must spend in his crate every day.
  • Puppies under six months of age shouldn’t stay in a crate for more than three or four hours at a time. They can’t control their bladders and bowels for that long.  The same goes for adult dogs that are being housetrained.  Physically, they can hold it, but they don’t know they’re supposed to.
  • Crate your dog only until you can trust him not to destroy the house. After that, it should be a place he goes voluntarily.

Selecting a Crate

Several types of crates are available:

  • Plastic (often called “flight kennels”)
  • Fabric on a collapsible, rigid frame
  • Collapsible, metal pens

Crates come in different sizes and can be purchased at most pet supply stores or pet supply catalogs.

Your dog’s crate should be just large enough for him to stand up and turn around in. If your dog is still growing, choose a crate size that will accommodate his adult size. Block off the excess crate space so your dog can’t eliminate at one end and retreat to the other.

The Crate Training Process

Crate training can take days or weeks, depending on your dog’s age, temperament, and past experiences. It’s important to keep two things in mind while crate training:

  • The crate should always be associated with something pleasant.
  • Training should take place in a series of small steps. Don’t go too fast.

cratetraingStep 1: Introduce Your Dog to the Crate

Place the crate in an area of your house where the family spends a lot of time, such as the family room. Put a soft blanket or towel in the crate. Take the door off and let the dog explore the crate at his leisure. Some dogs will be naturally curious and start sleeping in the crate right away.  If yours isn’t one of them:

  • Bring him over to the crate, and talk to him in a happy tone of voice. Make sure the crate door is open and secured so that it won’t hit your dog and frighten him.
  • Encourage your dog to enter the crate by dropping some small food treats nearby, then just inside the door, and finally, all the way inside the crate. If he refuses to go all the way in at first, that’s okay; don’t force him to enter.
  • Continue tossing treats into the crate until your dog will walk calmly all the way into the crate to get the food. If he isn’t interested in treats, try tossing a favorite toy in the crate. This step may take a few minutes or as long as several days.

Step 2: Feed Your Dog His Meals in the Crate

After introducing your dog to the crate, begin feeding him his regular meals near the crate. This will create a pleasant association with the crate.

  • If your dog is readily entering the crate when you begin Step 2, place the food dish all the way at the back of the crate.
  • If he remains reluctant to enter the crate, put the dish only as far inside as he will readily go without becoming fearful or anxious. Each time you feed him, place the dish a little further back in the crate.
  • Once your dog is standing comfortably in the crate to eat his meal, you can close the door while he’s eating. The first time you do this, open the door as soon as he finishes his meal. With each successive feeding, leave the door closed a few minutes longer, until he’s staying in the crate for ten minutes or so after eating.
  • If he begins to whine to be let out, you may have increased the length of time too quickly. Next time, try leaving him in the crate for a shorter time period. If he does whine or cry in the crate, don’t let him out until he stops. Otherwise, he’ll learn that the way to get out of the crate is to whine, so he’ll keep doing it.

Step 3: Lengthen the Crating Periods

After your dog is eating his regular meals in the crate with no sign of fear or anxiety, you can confine him there for short time periods while you’re home.

  • Call him over to the crate and give him a treat.
  • Give him a command to enter, such as “kennel.” Encourage him by pointing to the inside of the crate with a treat in your hand.
  • After your dog enters the crate, praise him, give him the treat, and close the door.
  • Sit quietly near the crate for five to ten minutes, and then go into another room for a few minutes. Return, sit quietly again for a short time, and then let him out of the crate.
  • Repeat this process several times a day, gradually increasing the length of time you leave him in the crate and the length of time you’re out of his sight.
  • Once your dog will stay quietly in the crate for about 30 minutes with you mostly out of sight, you can begin leaving him crated when you’re gone for short time periods and/or letting him sleep there at night. This may take several days or several weeks.

cratetraining3Step 4, Part A: Crate Your Dog When You Leave

After your dog can spend about 30 minutes in the crate without becoming anxious or afraid, you can begin leaving him crated for short periods when you leave the house.

  • Put him in the crate using your regular command and a treat. You might also want to leave him with a few safe toys in the crate.
  • Vary at what point in your “getting ready to leave” routine you put your dog in the crate. Although he shouldn’t be crated for a long time before you leave, you can crate him anywhere from five to 20 minutes prior to leaving.
  • Don’t make your departures emotional and prolonged—they should be matter-of-fact. Praise your dog briefly, give him a treat for entering the crate, and then leave quietly.

When you return home, don’t reward your dog for excited behavior by responding to him in an excited, enthusiastic way. Keep arrivals low key to avoid increasing his anxiety over when you will return. Continue to crate your dog for short periods from time to time when you’re home so he doesn’t associate crating with being left alone.

Step 4, Part B: Crate Your Dog at Night

Put your dog in the crate using your regular command and a treat. Initially, it may be a good idea to put the crate in your bedroom or nearby in a hallway, especially if you have a puppy. Puppies often need to go outside to eliminate during the night, and you’ll want to be able to hear your puppy when he whines to be let outside.

Older dogs, too, should initially be kept nearby so they don’t associate the crate with social isolation.

Once your dog is sleeping comfortably through the night with his crate near you, you can begin to gradually move it to the location you prefer, although time spent with your dog—even sleep time—is a chance to strengthen the bond between you and your pet.

Potential Problems

Whining. If your dog whines or cries while in the crate at night, it may be difficult to decide whether he’s whining to be let out of the crate, or whether he needs to be let outside to eliminate. If you’ve followed the training procedures outlined above, then your dog hasn’t been rewarded for whining in the past by being released from his crate. If that is the case, try to ignore the whining. If your dog is just testing you, he’ll probably stop whining soon. Yelling at him or pounding on the crate will only make things worse.

If the whining continues after you’ve ignored him for several minutes, use the phrase he associates with going outside to eliminate. If he responds and becomes excited, take him outside. This should be a trip with a purpose, not play time. If you’re convinced that your dog doesn’t need to eliminate, the best response is to ignore him until he stops whining. Don’t give in; if you do, you’ll teach your dog to whine loud and long to get what he wants. If you’ve progressed gradually through the training steps and haven’t done too much too fast, you’ll be less likely to encounter this problem. If the problem becomes unmanageable, you may need to start the crate training process over again.

Separation Anxiety. Attempting to use the crate as a remedy for separation anxiety won’t solve the problem. A crate may prevent your dog from being destructive, but he may injure himself in an attempt to escape from the crate. Separation anxiety problems can only be resolved with counter-conditioning and desensitization procedures. You may want to consult a professional animal-behavior specialist for help.

 

Source: humanesociety.org

Those Pesky Fleas

While fleas are active year round in the Pacific Northwest, they become more noticeable in warmer weather. Fleas are problems as they not only carry tapeworm, which can be transmitted to cats and dogs, but they make our pets itchy and scratchy, sometimes to the extent of causing severe dermatitis.

itchy
Impact of Fleas

The most frequent cause of itchy skin, or pruritis, is the pesky flea. Besides being a household nuisance, multiple flea bites can cause an allergic reaction in some pets that leads to flea allergy dermatitis. Allergies form because of an over reactive inflammatory response to an antigen and usually appear as redness, irritation and inflammation of the skin and ears, although the eyes and nasal passages may also become affected. For pets that develop this allergy, the most important thing is to ensure proper flea control both on their body and in their environment.

Detecting Fleas

Just because you don’t see fleas does not mean that your pets don’t have them. Fleas only live on the animals for a few hours to feed, then jump off, live and breed in the environment. Usually evidence of heavy flea infestations is seen on the animal in the form of “flea dirt” or flea excrement. Sometimes, we see the actual fleas (they are fast little buggers!).

Types of Fleas

Fleas are species-specific. So, cat and dog fleas don’t like to eat people! So if you’re getting bit, it’s either because the dog or cat is no longer in the environment and they are hungry or there are so many of them they need more than just your pet(s) to eat.

Flea Lifecycle

Flea eggs are tiny, shiny, and oval shaped objects that are laid by an adult flea on your pet. Given their shape, the eggs tend to fall from your pet onto bedding, carpet or where ever your pet spends time. A normal adult female flea will lay around 40 – 60 eggs per day which hatch in larvae in 1 to 20 days.

FLealifecycle
Larvae go through several stages of molting as they grow and feed on the “flea dirt” that you find where your pet sleeps or rests—including bedding and carpet.  After three molts the larvae pupate within “cocoons” enabling the flea to develop. During this period, the pupae can remain dormant for up to a year but often hatch in 7 to 10 days.

Once hatched, adult fleas use vibration and movement find new hosts and will quickly jump to obtain a meal. Fleas feed every 4 to 6 hours biting your pet during each feeding. Fleas tend to live several weeks unless otherwise controlled.

Controlling Fleas

Flea control starts in the environment. If you have a bad flea problem, washing bedding (your bed and your pet’s bed), regular vacuuming and cleaning are a great start. Then your veterinarian can prescribe a monthly flea control for your pets. Most flea control products today have quick kill times and break the flea’s life cycle before they can lay eggs.

Flea Products

We recommend keeping your pet on regular, year round flea control products. Currently there are both oral (for dogs) and topical (for both dogs and cats) formulations. Oral formulations tend to have a faster kill time than the topical formulations, but also require that the pest bites the pet before being effective. Currently oral combinations (Trifexis) guard against fleas, heartworms, and GI parasites. Topical combinations are effective for fleas, heartworms and GI parasites (Revolution) and flea and tick (Frontline). Generic brands are generally not recommended due to an increase in incidence of adverse side effects and lower effectiveness.

 

Adapted from: kirkwoodanimal.com

Lilies are Toxic to Cats

nolilliesforkitties

No Lilies for Kitties!

Why are the Easter holiday and Mother’s Day two of the most dangerous holidays for cats? The answer is simple—lily poisoning. Exposure to common lilies such as Easter lilies, tiger lilies and stargazer lilies sicken and kill thousands of cats annually. What’s even more dangerous is that less than 30% of cat owners realize these common and seemingly “benign” lilies are fatal to our feline friends. That’s about to change. We want to introduce you to a new educational campaign—‘No Lilies for Kitties!’

Pet Poison Helpline, in partnership with the Small Animal Welfare Committee of the Minnesota Veterinary Medical Association,  have teamed up to increase awareness of lily poisoning to cat owners and remind veterinarians that we are heading into lily season. Please help us spread the word and learn why you need to “leave out the lilies”.

Lilies 101

Many different kinds of plants are found or sold with “lily” as part of their name. A few grow wild in ditches and wooded areas, some are sold as bulbs in garden shops, and many are used in floral arrangements. If you live with cats, it’s critical to know which lilies are toxic to your feline friend.

The Most Dangerous Lilies for Cats

The most dangerous and potentially fatal lilies for cats are those found in the genus Lilium and Hemerocallis. These beautiful and affordable flowers are often found in cut-flower bouquets or potted for the Easter holiday. If you have cats at home, it’s critical that you do not bring these flowers inside.

asiaticlily

 

  • Asiatic Lily – including hybrids (Lilium asiatica)
  • Daylily (Hemerocallis species)
  • Easter lily (Lilium longiflorum)
  • Japanese Show lily (Lilium speciosum)
  • Rubrum lily (Lilium speciosum var. rubrum)
  • Stargazer lily (Lilium “Stargazer” – a hybrid)
  • Tiger lily (Lilium tigrinum or lancifolium)
  • Wood lily (Lilium philadelphicum or umbellatum)

These beautiful and affordable flowers are often found in cut-flower bouquets or potted for the Easter holiday. If you have cats at home, it’s critical that you do not bring these flowers inside. The toxin has not been identified, but exposure to any part of the plant, including leaves, flowers, pollen, or even the water from the vase may result in acute kidney failure in cats. These ingestions are medical emergencies requiring immediate veterinary care. Early decontamination, aggressive intravenous fluid therapy, renal function tests, and supportive care greatly improve a cat’s prognosis. A delay of treatment of more than 18 hours after ingestion generally results in irreversible renal failure. Dogs may experience minor gastrointestinal upset after ingestion of these lilies but do not appear to develop kidney damage.

Safer Cut-Flower Alternatives

When buying flowers or ordering them for delivery, remember to “leave out the lilies”! It’s advisable to specifically instruct florists to not include and liliwes in the Lilium species such as stargazer, Asiatic, Oriental or tiger lilies. Giving florists the specific name of the flower species can help avoid confusion.

tulips

Instead, consider these safer alternatives for cut flower arrangements and bouquets:

  • Carnation*
  • Daisy (Gerbera and others)
  • Hyancith*
  • Iris*
  • Chrysanthemum a.k.a. Mums*
  • Orchid
  • Peruvian Lily (Alstroemeria species)*
  • Rose
  • Spring crocus
  • Snapdragon
  • Sunflower
  • Tulips*
  • Zinnia

*These plants may cause more gastrointestinal irritation or upset (drooling, vomiting, and/or diarrhea) than others on the list but are not expected to cause severe poisoning (i.e. kidney, liver or nervous system effects).

 

Other Highly Toxic Lilies (risk to dogs, cats, and people)

Other types of dangerous “lily” plants include the lily of the valley (Convallaria majalis) and gloriosa or flame lily (Gloriosa superba).   Lily of the valley contains cardenolides or digitalis like toxins which do not cause kidney failure, but may cause life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias and death when ingested by dogs, cats, or people.  Equally toxic to all animals is the gloriosa lily. The toxic agent is colchicine (toxic to rapidly dividing cells); the roots or tubers may contain enough toxins to cause serious multi-system organ failure in cats and dogs that chew on them. Early and aggressive therapy is generally needed when these plants are ingested.

Less Harmful Lilies (risk to dog and cats)

Less serious consequences occur when pets chew or swallow plant pieces from “lilies” such as the calla lily (Zantedeschia spp.) and peace lily (Spathiphyllum spp.) which contain insoluble oxalate crystals that are direct irritants to the mouth, tongue, throat, and esophagus. Drooling, foaming, or pawing at the mouth, vocalization, and vomiting are commonly reported when pets chew on these plants; respiratory distress due to swelling of the airway can occur but is more rare. The Peruvian lily (Alstromeria aurea) contains tulipin A, a toxin that may cause gastrointestinal problems such as vomiting or diarrhea if ingested in large amounts. None of these lilies cause acute kidney failure in cats like the Lilium or Hemerocallis (daylily) species.

What to do if your pet eats a lily?

Cats and other pets consuming any part of a “lily” plant may need immediate veterinary medical care. In order to quickly assess the severity of the situation, pet owners should call Pet Poison Helpline (800-213-6680) or bring the animal and plant to their veterinarian as soon as possible.  Early identification of the specific lily and appropriate treatment will usually prevent most undesirable outcome

 

source: petpoisonhelpline.com

Calming Your Dog During a Thunderstorm

thunderstorm

Tips for Keeping Your Dog Calm During Thunderstorms

It is very common for dogs to feel upset by the booming thunder and flashing lightening of a thunderstorm.  In fact, because dogs are especially sensitive to barometric pressure, they can sense an oncoming storm before you can.  They may start to act anxious, chew on things or even run away in a panic.  While it may seem natural to sit down on the floor and coddle your dog in soothing tones during a thunderstorm, this will only reinforce his or her anxious behavior in the long run.  These tips can help you learn how to calm your dog during a storm by teaching him that it’s only noise and nothing to get upset about.

Calm Your Dog’s Thunderstorm Anxiety: Calmness Begins with You

First:   Dogs can pick up on their humans’ feeling, so it is important for you to stay calm if you are to be able to calm your dog.  If they sense your anxiety, that will only make them feel and act worse.

Second:  Provide a safe, enclosed, den-like area where your dog can securely sit out the storm.  A crate inside the house is the perfect place because they feel safer there with a blanket and chew toy to gnaw on.  If your dog is an outside dog, cover his kennel with a blanket and make sure he is secured inside.

Third:  If you do not use a crate to calm your dog, make sure the room where you keep him is safe and devoid of small or sharp objects that he could swallow or chew on, as they may do when they are stressed out.  Crating is recommended, but if this is not possible for you, make sure he has a soft, secure place where he feels safe.  Keep the doors and windows closed and curtained to dull outside noises and lights of the storm.  Sometimes turning on a TV or some music that the dog is used to hearing can dull sounds and help calm your dog.

Fourth:  Keep your dog away from exits and entrances into your home.  Some dogs become so stressed out that they may attack people coming in or out.  He may also make a run for it if the door is opened.

Fifth:  One great way to calm your dog’s thunderstorm fear is to condition him to accept that storms are nothing to worry about.  Using environmental recordings of storms, starting out softly and then making them gradually louder while having everyone else in the house go calmly about their business has reprogrammed many dogs to stay calm during a storm.  This may take some time, but many owners have had success with this method.

Note:  If your dog has an accident during a storm, be patient and understanding.  Don’t make a big deal about it and be prepared to clean up without a lot of fanfare.

***We urge you to have identification on your dog.  Both tags on the collar AND a microchip will help ensure the safe return of your dog in the event that he does escape***

 

Source: woodbridgeanimalhospital.com